Exhibition: "Oh, You Fancy! Black Hair & Fashion"
Jun
29
to Jan 16

Exhibition: "Oh, You Fancy! Black Hair & Fashion"

  • Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

From Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History:

Featuring more than 20 fashion designers and 11 hair stylists, Oh You Fancy! provides a brief history of African American designing, creating, and influencing fashion wear and hairstyles, both nationally and internationally.  

Hair: 

African Americans have been taught many lessons, but one neglected lesson is that our hair is the crown we never take off

Oh, You Fancy! explores the extensive history of our “crowns.” In Africa, we respected our ethnic coiffures, then survived 400 years with our hair in bondage, made the straight styles of the 1900s our own, returned to kinky pride in the 1960s, and are relishing freedom of choice in the 21st century. 


To illustrate the history of black hair, this exhibition relies on the unique and creative perspectives of eight professional hair stylists, and seven innovators and entrepreneurs. Their creations, vivid photographs, hair sculptures, and mixed media works punctuate a history of political consciousness, social awareness, and beauty trendsetting. 

Fashion:

Oh, You Fancy! is a survey of fashions created by African, African American and other Diaspora designers who work in different fashion genres. Their objective is to influence what we wear and empower our sense of self through beautiful clothes and accessories. 

Divided into four genres: high fashion, readywear, menswear, and the future. Across all areas, you will see how early designers, who often worked twice as hard to gain acceptance, paved the way for others to be noticed in an already competitive industry dominated by Italy and France. 

From High Fashion to The Future, these black designers spans decades and crisscrosses countries, cultures, concepts and accomplishments. All share one vision, to uplift and empower us through our attire. Their designs not only push the envelope of fashion, but will also have you saying, “Oh, you fancy!” 

Oh, You Fancy! Black Hair & Fashion is free with museum admission.

View Event →
Panel: "Decolonizing Fashion" at the Costume Society of America 2019 Symposium
Apr
15
to Apr 20

Panel: "Decolonizing Fashion" at the Costume Society of America 2019 Symposium

April 15-20, Seattle Westin Hotel, Seattle, Washington, USA

The Research Collective for Decolonizing Fashion (RCDF; formerly the Non-Western Fashion Conference) was established in 2012 to move beyond the stubbornly persistent euro – and ethnocentric underpinnings of dominant fashion discourse and to construct alternative narratives. The RCDF recognizes that fashion systems are diverse, span world cultures, and have long histories. We engage critical investigation and dialogue into that often denied, forgotten or otherwise hidden diversity, as we explore interconnections among fashion systems outside the dominant ‘world fashion city’ network.  

We approach diverse fashion systems around the world through multidisciplinary and multicultural forums and seek through our research new critical paradigms within cross-cultural perspectives. We understand that ‘fashion globalization,’ far from representing a remedial development, perpetuates Eurocentric biases in fashion discourse on a wider geographical stage. 

Papers can explore any of the above themes from any disciplinary or interdisciplinary perspective.  We welcome submissions from academics, curators, designers and industry professionals who are creatively and critically involved in fashion systems everywhere in the world. 

To present a paper, authors need to join the Costume Society of America and register for the symposium. 

For information on the CSA Symposium, visit

http://costumesocietyamerica.com/national-symposia/proceedings/.

For information on the Research Collective for Decolonizing Fashion, visit

https://www.facebook.com/researchcollectivedf

Please submit your 300 word abstracts by email to Leslie Rabine (lwrabine@gmail.com) or Angela Jansen (mangelajansen@gmail.com) before 30th of July 2018.

 

View Event →
Symposium: "The Pacific Rim & Beyond: Diffusion and Diversity in Dress" (Costume Society of America)
Apr
15
to Apr 20

Symposium: "The Pacific Rim & Beyond: Diffusion and Diversity in Dress" (Costume Society of America)

Call for Submissions:

Please note that we are issuing all calls at this time.

1) Research, Traditional and Visual Experienceview the call here.  Contact the Abstract Administrator, Joann Stabb, for more information: jcstabb@ucdavis.edu.

  • Traditional research is designated as a formal style of research with a problem statement, purpose of the study, thesis or hypothesis, methodology and conclusion(s) for discussion. Those wanting to do an Oral presentation (one person or a panel), or a Poster-Style Exhibit fall into this category. View the rubric here.

  • Visual Experience Research utilizes the same research style, but results in a mostly visual presentation that may include, but is not limited to mounted (museum) exhibitions or design approaches such as theatrical shows. In the past these have been called “Arm-Chair tours”, but call for the same level of research as the traditional category. View the rubric here.

2) Professional Development Sessions: view the call here, and the rubric here.  Contact the Professional Development Chair, Naomi Arnst, for more information: njarnst@gmail.com.
The intent of a professional development session is to introduce attendees to new topics and content to further their growth in the field or to enhance current knowledge.

3) Design Exhibit: view the call here, and the rubric here. Contact the Design Exhibition Chair, Abra Flores, for more information: abrapilarflores@gmail.com.
The planning committee for the symposium seeks submissions of creative work related to dress studies. Submissions from a wide spectrum of the field are welcomed and include but are not limited to: costuming, reproductions, fiber art, weaving, fashion design, technology in design, textile design, handcrafts, and other work completed with textiles as a foundation.

All Abstracts are due on September 1, 2018.  

CSA-2019-Poster-2.jpg
View Event →

Conference: "Fashion: Now & Then"
Oct
18
to Oct 20

Conference: "Fashion: Now & Then"

  • LIM College, Maxwell Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Theme: “Fashion and Culture”

When: Thursday, October 18, 2018 - Saturday, October 20, 2018                                                                               

Where: LIM College, Maxwell Hall, 216 East 45th Street, New York, NY

Proposal Submission Due Date:  Monday, June 4, 2018

Date of Notification: Monday, June 25, 2018

Submission Proposal Form

The Adrian G. Marcuse Library at LIM College invites participation in the eighth annual Fashion: Now & Then Conference, a three-day conference in which participants will discuss the past, present, and future uses of fashion information as it relates to culture. Participants will be drawn from libraries, archives, academic institutions, publishers, collectors, museums, and the fashion industry to represent a full range of expertise.

The theme for this year’s conference is “Fashion and Culture.” We look forward to receiving proposals for 15-minute presentations or hour-long panels that will examine both the current and evolving relationship between fashion and culture. Fifteen-minute presentations can be presented by an individual or a pair and will be grouped into sessions by the conference organizer. Panel presentations should include 2-4 speakers addressing a common topic and will be scheduled as a session. Those submitting a panel presentation proposal must have secured a commitment from all participants.  Proposal topics can include one or more of these subjects in relation to fashion or style: archives, libraries, special collections, museums, ephemera, fashion history, fashion studies, fashion forecasting, fashion analytics, magazines, music, media, data visualization, marketing, material culture, merchandising, photography, preservation, product development, rare books, retail, social media, street style, textiles, and trend reporting.

The event will take place Thursday October 18 - Saturday October 20, 2018 at LIM College in the Maxwell Hall building at 216 East 45th Street, New York, NY.

View Event →
Presentation: "Fashion and Slavery, A New Course in Fashion History" by Jonathan M. Square
Oct
5
1:30 PM13:30

Presentation: "Fashion and Slavery, A New Course in Fashion History" by Jonathan M. Square

  • Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Alfond Auditorium (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

From the symposium, “Mass Fashion: Past, Present , and Future”:

Scholar Jonathan M. Square will present a paper on fashion and slavery for the “Mass Fashion” symposium, and the description for the symposium is listed below:

Mass Fashion: Past, Present, Future, a joint public symposium, is scheduled for October 5-6, 2018, at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. It will feature established and emerging Boston designers such as Chris Donovan, Zainab Koroma, Suzanne Watzman, and Erin Robertson, winner of Project Runway season 15, along industry experts such as Chris Wawrousek of New Balance and Tosha Hays of Advanced Functional Fabrics of America. They will be joined by curators and academics who will provide a context for discussing such topics as Industry, Education, Technology, Progressivism, Immigration, and why Massachusetts is the Future of Fashion. Each session will include three 20-minutes talks and be followed by a panel discussion in which audience participation will be encouraged. 

Tickets are free and available on a first come, first served basis. They can be picked up the morning of each day of the symposium between 10:00 and 11:00 a.m. at the Huntington Avenue entrance of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 465 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. If you have any questions, please contact Catherine Tutter at ctutter@mfa.org.

The symposium is sponsored by the Ann and John Clarkeson Lecture and Programming Fund for Textiles and Costume, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

View the full schedule here.

View Event →
Project: Jes Fan: "Obscure Functions: Experiments In Decolonizing Melanin"
Sep
7
to Oct 26

Project: Jes Fan: "Obscure Functions: Experiments In Decolonizing Melanin"

From Recess Art:

September 7, Jes Fan will begin work on Obscure Functions: Experiments in Decolonizing Melanin, a project that will investigate the material agency of melanin, the natural pigment that determines skin color, and the implications of its usage outside of the body. 

Combining original video work, a central sculpture, and a series of laboratory gloveboxes stationed throughout Recess, Fan’s project will invite visitors to physically manipulate melanin and explore the substance as a sculptural material and coating agent. 

Throughout his Session, Fan will research the radioactive properties of melanin which the artist will source from genetically modified e-coli bacteria and fungi. When harvested commercially, this banal black powder, embedded with a cascade of social meanings, is sold at a market price of over $300 a gram, and experimented with as an anti-radioactive coating for spacecrafts. It lives in fungi, in mold, in cephalopod ink— but once embodied by human skin, this pigment siphons the host to a social organizing principle that is known as race.

At Recess, the host for melanin will not be human but bacteria, a perceived adversarial substance that shares connotations with racist notions that non-white bodies are infectious and impure, of miscegenation as a dangerous contamination, and broader anxieties of racial intimacy. Obscure Functions will consider skin as a medium of “touching” and “feeling,” and the ways both are implicated in the construction of race. Feeling, even when triggered at a distance—by sight, ear, memory, or smell— becomes embodied and expressed through the skin. Fan’s project lays bare the ways in which the lives of racialized bodies are touched by melanin.

 

Open to the public Tuesday-Saturday, 12-6pm; Thursday, 2-8pm

View Event →